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Tunguska-associated asteroids
CITATIONS

The International Astronomical Union is the sole authority for assigning designations and names to celestial bodies and the surface features there on. The discoverer is accorded the privilege of suggesting a name for his/her discovery. Names are judged by the nine-person Small Bodies Names Committee of Commission 20 of the International Astronomical Union, comprised of professional astronomers (with research interests in the asteroid field) from around the world. Accepted names are announced when they are published in the Minor Planet Circulars, issued monthly by the Minor Planet Center.
The MINOR PLANET CIRCULARS are published, on behalf of Commission 20 of the International Astronomical Union, usually in batches on the date of each full moon, by:

(2794) Kulik = 1978 PS3
Discovered 1978 Aug. 8 by N. S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Named in memory of Leonid Alekseevich Kulik (1883-1942), Soviet mineralogist, researcher of meteorites, and a founder of meteoric research in the U.S.S.R. He is particularly known for his investigation of the place and circumstances of the Tunguska event.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 9215.
Orbital elements
(2887) Krinov = 1977 QD5
Discovered 1977 Aug. 22 by N. S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Named in memory of Evgenij Leonidovich Krinov (1906-1984), celebrated  Soviet meteoriticist, recipient of the Leonard medal of the American Meteoritical Society.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 11157-11158.
Orbital elements
(4199) Andreev = 1983 RX2
Discovered on 1983 September 1, by H. Debehogne at ESO-La Silla. For all the Andreev's in the world and particularly for the family of Genadij (Tamara, Olga and Vica). Genadij is professor at the University of   Tomsk as a specialist of Celestial Mechanics, Asteroids, Comets and Meteor Streams.  He is one of the leaders of the Toungouska's missions performed by the University of Tomsk to solve the question of the Toungouska's event which occurred in 1908, in Siberia, destroying more than 2.200 square kilometers.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 21609.
Orbital elements
(4328) Valina = 1982 SQ2
Discovered 1982 Sept. 18 by H. Debehogne at the European Southern Observatory. Named in honor of Valentina Arkadievna Andreichenko (and her daughter Alina Eduardovna) for her collaboration with the discoverer in the Tomsk-Observatory-Brussels-Program, which was created in order to realize observations, in particular at the European Southern Observatory at La Silla, as well as orbital improvements and theoretical works in astrometry and celestial mechanics. Valentina has participated in expeditions to the site of the 1908 Tunguska event.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 22829.
Orbital elements
(4917) Yurilvovia = 1973 SC6
Discovered 1973 Sept. 28 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Named in memory of Yurij Alekseevich L'vov (1932-1994), deputy director of the Institute of Biology and Biophysics at the Tomsk State University. A prominent geobotanist and ecologist, L'vov was for 30 years an organizer of the regular expeditions to Tunguska, and he made important contributions to the study of the 1908 impact.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 27127.
Orbital elements
(4931) Tomsk = 1983 CN3
Discovered on 1982 September 18, by H. Debehogne at ESO-La Silla. For all the Russian collaborators of the discoverer at the University of Tomsk in Celestial Mechanics and all the kind people and distinguished women of this city of more than 500.000 inhabitants, on the Tomsk River, at 700 km South-West of the Toungouska's event in 1908, in Siberia. This city is more than 3.5 centuries old.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 21609.
Orbital elements
(5302) Romanoserra = 1976 YF5
Discovered 1976 December 18 by N.S. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Named in honour of Romano Serra (b. 1954), enthusiastic president of the amateur observatory of San Giovanni in Persiceto near Bologna. A great specialist in meteorites, he has gathered the largest collection of meteorite specimens in Italy. He partecipated in two Tunguska expeditions, in 1991 and 1998, and built a planetarium, the third largest in Italy.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 34341.

Orbital elements

Observability

(5471) Tunguska = 1988 PK1
Discovered 1988 Aug. 13 by E. W. Elst at Haute Provence. Named for the site, in Siberia, of the presumed impact of a 60-meter minor planet on the 85th anniversary of the great explosion that occurred there on 1908 June 30.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 22250.
Orbital elements
(5948) Longo = 1985 JL
Discovered 1985 May 15 by E. Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station of the Lowell Observatory. Named in honour of Giuseppe Longo, a physicist at the University of Bologna. For most of his professionnal life a nuclear physicist, in the late 1980s Longo became interested in the Tunguska event. He participated in an expedition to the site of the explosion in 1991, at which time microscopic particles, trapped in the resin of surviving trees, were collected. Later detailed analysis showed that the annual distribution of the particles peaked in 1908, and elements were identified that probably originated in meteoritic material. Longo recently organized in Bologna the first workshop where Russian and other modelers of the Tunguska event met and compared their views and results.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 28621.

Orbital elements

Orbit

Observability

(6205) Menottigalli = 1983 OD
Discovered 1983 July 17 by E. Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station of Lowell Observatory. Named in honour of Menotti Galli (b. 1922), a physicist at the University of Bologna. Galli's research activity began with the study of cosmic rays and meteorites and was subsequently extended to the physics of the Sun and the heliosphere. He has studied Sun-Earth relationships, cosmogenic isotopes, and radiocarbon in tree rings. He suggested searching for microparticles embedded in the resin of trees surviving the Tunguska explosion, and he partecipated in the 1991 expedition to collect the necessary wood samples, with the result that a group of elements was identified as possible constituents of the Tunguska body.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 33786.

Orbital elements

Observability

(6319) Beregovoj = 1990 WJ3
Discovered 1990 Nov. 19 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Named in memory of the Russian cosmonaut Georgij Beregovoj (1921-1995). In October 1968 he orbited the earth 64 times in a Soyuz 3 spacecraft and was safely recovered on land at Karaganda. He also performed space maneuvers near an unmanned Soyuz 2 spacecraft. Author of more than 300 scientific articles, he always put an emphasis on the importance of the role of the human factor in cosmic flights. Beregovoj was a member of the organizing committee for the 1995 international meeting ``Ecological consequences of the collision of the earth with small bodies of the solar system''. His efforts led to the acquisition from the Russian government of a military airplane for use in the 37th expedition to Vanavara-Tunguska, and he hoped to participate in this exploration of the site of the 1908 impact. Sadly, he died unexpectedly during medical treatment shortly beforehand.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 25655.
Orbital elements
(6364) Casarini = 1981 ET
Discovered 1981 Mar. 5 by H. Debehogne and G. De Sanctis at the European Southern Observatory. Jeannine Casarini, a French teacher, participated in the Tunguska99 scientific expedition to Central Siberia, contributing strongly to the organization and to the success of this difficult enterprise.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 55985 .
Orbital elements |Photo 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
(6404) Vanavara = 1991 PS6
Discovered 1991 Aug. 6 by E.W.Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Named for the town near the Podkammenaya (stony) Tunguska river in Siberia. On 1908 June 30 a large bolide, probably an asteroidal fragment, exploded in the atmosphere, about 70 km north of Vanavara. Almost 2000 square kilometers of the taiga forest were suddenly flattened. Tungus reindeer herders, living in the forests, were thrown to the ground, and many of them lost their herds and tepees. Several houses in Vanavara were damaged. On the occasion of the 37-th expedition to Tunguska, the discoverer was very warmly received by the people of Vanavara.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 25979.
Orbital elements
(6483) Nikolajvasil'ev = 1990 EO4
Discovered 1990 Mar. 2 by E.W.Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Named in honour of Nikolaj Vasil'ev, scientific director of the Interdisciplinary Independent Tunguska Expeditions. A professor of medicine and a well-known oncologist at the Institute for Microbiology in Kharkov, he has for many years been interested in the history and scientific investigation of the Tunguska event. In his capacity as IITE director he and other members of the group succeeded in having 4000 square kilometers of the Tunguska region set aside as a national reserve for the next 20 years.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 26425.
Orbital elements
(8809) Roversimonaco = 1981 WE1
Fabio Roversi Monaco (b. 1938) has been rector of the University of Bologna since 1985. He encouraged and strongly supported the organization of the first (1991) and second (1999) Italian scientific expeditions to the site of the Tunguska event.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 40575.
Orbital elements Observability
(14354) Kolesnikov = 1987 QX7
Discovered 1987 Aug. 21 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Evgeniy Kolesnikov (b. 1935) is a Russian scientist who has conducted research at the Tunguska impact site near Vanavara.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 55986 .

Orbital elements

(14479) Plekanov = 1994 CQ13
) Discovered 1994 Feb. 8 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Gennadiy Plekanov (b. 1926) is a Russian scientist from Tomsk University who has conducted scientific investigations for 30 years at the Tunguska impact site near Vanara. In July 1995 the discoverer accompanied him on an excursion to the Tunguska explosion area.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 55986 .

Orbital elements

(19504) Vladalekseev = 1998 LL2
Discovered 1998 June 1 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Vladmimir Alekseev (b. 1935), a physicist at the Troitsk Institute in Moscow, has searched the Tunguska site for pieces of the impacting body. He made radar measurements up to a depth of 80 meters.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 55986 .

Orbital elements

(27719) Fast = 1989 SR3
Discovered 1989 Sept. 26 by E. W. Elst at the European Southern Observatory. Wilhelm Fast (1936-2005), a mathematician from Tomsk University, directed a project to measure the azimuths of the fallen trees due to the impact of the Tunguska body. From these data theoretical models of the impact were developed. The name also honors also his daughter Annie (b. 1978), who assisted in subsequent projects.
Citation Reference: Minor Planet Circular 55987 .

Orbital elements




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